HUB

09

Apr 2012

2nd Conditional – If I had a million dollars, I would give it to charity

We use the second conditional to talk about impossible situations. IF + PAST SIMPLE – WOULD + INFINITIVE (Condition) WOULD + INFINITIVE + IF + PAST SIMPLE  (Condition) If I went to Madrid, I’d visit the Prado Gallery. I wouldn’t do that if I were you. Subjects I / he/ she /it – we use the subjective form. He he were in London, he would…

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09

Apr 2012

P2 into, in to, onto, on to…

In to or INTO – On to or ONTO INTO (preposition) Into + object + modifiers of objects. Examples: She put the toys into the basket. He walked into the room and found a mouse. The prince turned into a frog. In to In a phrase In is an adverb followed by the preposition to. For example: Can you give this paper in to the…

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09

Apr 2012

Google Produces Information Eyewear

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrfXtAHYoVA Google are about to launch a new product that will enable you to access certain aspects of information from the Internet and displayed directly onto your glasses. The eyewear still appears to have a streamlined design despite their functionality.


04

Feb 2012

Kids really brought their imagination…

Kids really brought their imagination… Bring shows movement toward the speaker Can you take me a bottle of water? Incorrect Can you bring me a bottle of water? Correct Bring —-> toward speaker A common mistake for English learning is Bring and Take. They have very similar meanings but differ in direction. Take away from the speaker Can you take this to the living room? Can…

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04

Feb 2012

anymore….. What don’t you do anymore?

  Anymore: any longer, nowadays Example: Harry doesn’t travel anymore.   Anymore is properly used in a statement about a change in a previous condition or activity. It is often spelled as a two words, any more, but most authorities accept it as a compound word today.   Anymore / Any more Any more (two words) means “no more”; anymore (one word) means “now,” “currently,” “at this time.” Both are used with negative constructions. >…

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